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      Green Building in Boston (Part 1)

      Green Building in Boston (Part 1)

      Taking into consideration that Boston is one of the few cities in the nation with rich history, one would guess that, proper preservation and specialized use of building materials would be of major importance.  Since some materials can effect the health of building  inhabitants and its surrounding environments, materials used in construction is a main focal point.  The use of sustainable green products in remodeling, preservation, and building construction is good for the environment and  helps to prevent residents from health problems such as lung cancer, mesothelioma, and other asbestos-related diseases.

      Going green has been considered more of a luxury and not so much of a cost effective choice in the past but things are changing. Since the 1980's Boston has been slowly been remodeled, firstly by removing the usage of asbestos in new building projects and secondly by redoing the ones previously build. Moving forward, a local organization focused on sustainable community development initiated the renovation of 82 different units of family housing and in Jamaica Plain and Roxbury. The project was put into motion by a company called Urban Edge, a community development corporation which specializes in sustainable and green living. Urban Edge and a few of other green building companies are responsible for the remodeling of  a number of affordable apartments just within the city of Boston. Up to date, such companies  have completed a green renovation of over one hundred rental apartments in the Dorchester and Jamaica Plain areas, setting an example for all green building projects. Further, their most recent project is another step along the path of the Urban Edge "integrated green" development initiative that provides low cost, environmentally sound housing which has gained lots of traction since their first project launched in 2006, which incorporated renewable energy into Egleston Crossing, a mixed-use building. These are just a few of the projects led by green building enthusiasts and innovators slowly but maturely transforming Boston and its surroundings to a new wave of more sustainable and healthy way of living.